"Am I not a man and a brother?" [England, 1837]


Even with complete abolition that is british London in particular remained a hotbed of abolitionist activity, particularly pertaining to the Americas. Prominent Americans toured there, and books written by ...



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Some random comments on reddit about "Am I not a man and a brother?" [England, 1837]

  • Even after complete British abolition, London in particular remained a hotbed of abolitionist activity, especially with regard to the Americas. Prominent Americans toured there, and books written by (or about) freed slaves or the slavery situation remained popular. Abolitionist support was virulent at all levels of society, to the point that during the American Civil War the Confederate attempts to gain recognition from the government were hindered heavily by British popular opinion (despite some prominent British officials indicating support for the cause).
  • I'm not an expert, but this was a 1787 version of it, when slavery was still legal in Britain. I recall my professor saying that the 1837 version was used to support American Abolitionists.
  • I think i prefer the 1787 version, though it's hard to put my finger on what i like better about it.
  • Well, for one, it's a higher quality print - actual detail in the figure, as opposed to mildly different shades of black. Plus the unframed layout works quite nicely in a web browser that shows white background outside of the image.
  • I do like high detail.
  • I can understand why you'd think there'd be a question mark at the end.
  • The original design is from a medallion distributed by Wedgewood in support of the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade and includes the question mark.
  • Out of curiosity, is it a period instead of a question mark because it's rhetorical?
  • Pretty cool. A rubber stamp, it looks like?
  • Probably a woodcut. Rubber stamps weren't around until the middle of the 19th century, sometime after the invention of vulcanised rubber, and this design is associated with the abolition movement of the 18th century.
  • Nice. I hesitated adding that qualification. Though he says 1837, the mid 19th century.
  • Read more comments


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