Prisoner identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during World War II, 1944, see comment.


Good gravy. Great post. Oh thank you, it is just brown and water wow! That is freaking awesome! Movie please! My Dad was in Vietnam and informs a story that is crazy. Tends there had been ...



This image with the title of "Prisoner identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during World War II, 1944, see comment." is one of a large collection of pictures from the category WWII Pics . We collect quality images, from a social network website reddit.com

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Some random comments on reddit about Prisoner identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during World War II, 1944, see comment.

  • Good gravy. Great post.
  • Oh thank you, it's just brown and water
  • wow! That is freaking awesome! Movie please!
  • My Dad was in Vietnam and tells a crazy story. Seems there were two guys in different platoons who looked very much like each other. During an intense fire fight one of them was killed and mistaken for the other. Days later, the supposed dead guy walks out of the jungle surprising everyone. Long story short, he's immediately sent home and arrives to his own funeral. He thankfully didn't walk in, but notified the mortician's wife.
  • He thankfully didn't walk in, but notified the mortician's wife. Better man than I, since I would have strolled in saying "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated!"
  • That would be very tempting.
  • Can you imagine his mother - thinking he was dead - watching him walk in the front door? I'm sure it's the secret dream of every mother who has ever lost a son.
  • That what I was thinking about while reading the OP. How would you break the news? Would you call before showing up or knock and say "HAI GUISE!" ? I'd show up in person.
  • I've long consider faking my own death and popping back up multiple times just so people would always believe I was still alive out there somewhere. I'd have to be much more melodramatic than just walking in full of bluster. You go in and sit in the back. Ask someone you don't recognize whose funeral it is. Move a few seats forward. Ask if that's his mother while pointing to mom. Move forward and find a friend. Tell him to be quiet. Wait for people to start paying respects. Get in line. Assuming an empty, closed casket, open it up and start crawling in. When everyone is freaking out say, "What? You got such a nice casket for me it'd be a waste if I didn't try it out at least once!"
  • The truth is that it's often the secret dream of anyone who knows someone who died. The feeling that they could walk in at any moment is very palpable. Like when someone pulls up outside and you hear the car door close but they haven't rung the doorbell yet.
  • I'm not too familiar with how casualties were classified during the war, but if no body was recovered and nobody saw him get killed, wouldn't it make more sense to classify him as MIA rather than KIA?
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