Japanese soldiers climb out of rocks and bushes of Kerama-retto and into water to give themselves up to crew of picket boat, May, 1945.


IIRC, the picture that is only film where you can in fact see Japanese soldiers for action is in aided by the Marines on Tarawa (Which irrespective is an incredible duration documentary with second-to-none footage in ...



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Some random comments on reddit about Japanese soldiers climb out of rocks and bushes of Kerama-retto and into water to give themselves up to crew of picket boat, May, 1945.

  • IIRC, the only picture or film where you can actually see Japanese soldiers in action is in With the Marines on Tarawa (Which regardless is a fantastic period documentary with second-to-none footage in general.) EDIT: The moment itself , for the lazy.
  • That's an interesting film. Thanks for posting it.
  • Could someone ELI5 why this is?
  • Propaganda films from pretty much everyone except Japan often showed footage of "our boys" in action. The Japanese didn't have much propaganda films to begin with I think and when they did it wasn't so much raw combat footage. EDIT: Simply google image search "British WW2 soldier" then "American WW2 Soldier" "German WW2 Soldier" etc then compare it to the results from "Japanese WW2 Soldier" Most of the Japanese stuff is drawn illustrations, pre war, ceremonial while the other nations have a lot more images of troops in the field, smiling more candid stuff. This would have also been because private ownership of cameras was more widespread in other nations, my grandfather for instance serving in the Pacific with the RNZAF had his own camera, coincidentally he actually has a photo of a rather large column of Japanese prisoners.
  • I had to do a bit of research on Japanese propaganda for school a while back. While a lot of other countries propaganda focused on destroying/defeating the enemy, the majority of Japan's propaganda was about dying for your family and country and bring honor etc etc so if what you are saying is correct too, I doubt the government really had much of an incentive to film any battle.
  • I wouldn't say that's entirely correct. The main reason is language. If you search these results in Japanese they do come up. If you search it in English, it doesn't. During the war period and the 5-10 years beforehand, war time news was broadcasted via 'Nippon News' to the whole nation. Example - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qA64tWafJc The Japanese employed the media system just as much as the Allied forces did. The only difference is you just got to search this stuff in Japanese, not English.
  • Lol people up voted my hsit anyway. You're probably right.
  • What are they demonstrating in the video? Bootleg wartime Olympics?
  • Nope, that's a sporting event for the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, in celebration of 2600 years for Japan. Participating nations include Japan, Manchuria, the Philippines and China (under Japanese control).
  • I doubt the government really had much of an incentive to film any battle. That's a pretty bad argument. Any propagandistic agenda, specially the idea of dying for you country, can be idealized through film and have great impact.
  • I suppose you are right. Film is a powerful medium and dying for your country could be a very effective message if filmed. I don't really know why I said that. Watch this video to learn more about Japanese propaganda: https://youtu.be/lFavUjEYc7Y A lot of what I know is just because of this guy. The video is pretty high quality and very informative. You also get to see propaganda (in the form of Kamishibai) that I haven't really been able to find anywhere else. After rewatching that video, I think the reason there isn't more film of Japanese soldiers might have something to do with the availability of cameras. I can't be sure but we would need to find out how popular or widely used cameras were in Japan around that time (1930 - 1945). It just seems strange that a lot of their propaganda is in this Kamishibai form when they have the option of film, so I'm guessing they might just not have had the option.
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