Armored amphibious tractors of a Marine battalion form into line as the first waves of the Marine invaders commence the charge for the beach at Okinawa. April 1, 1945.


They are practical, but to consider them because the solution to landings that are amphibious flawed. Firstly, these automobiles are made as amphibious tank variations of infantry transports, much less landing art, ...



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Some random comments on reddit about Armored amphibious tractors of a Marine battalion form into line as the first waves of the Marine invaders commence the charge for the beach at Okinawa. April 1, 1945.

  • They are practical, but to think of them as the answer to amphibious landings is flawed. Firstly, these vehicles are designed as amphibious tank variants of infantry transports, not as landing craft, and the crew are tied to the tank, which requires infantry support. These vehicles are decently armored and armed, but consequently cannot transport infantry. This means that the main force must land in amphibious craft designed for transport. There were three main examples of these types of craft in the U.S. armed forces: the Higgins Boat, which were the primary landing vehicle used on D-Day; the LVT-1, the original transport variant of the pictured amphibious tanks, which was equipped with 2 .50 caliber M2 machine guns and 2 .30 caliber machine guns, and could travel on land as well as in the sea; and Duck-boats, those boats that are now used to give tours of port cities. All of these craft are open top, and had little meaningful armor once their doors were deployed (excluding the Duck-boats, which required the infantry to dismount over the side).
  • They were notably unreliable and broke down constantly. My grandfather was actually awarded a Bronze Star for his leadership with the 788th Amph. Tractors at Okinawa for keeping 50 of these vehicles running when they continued to break down. Sometimes they would just designate the vehicle in the worst shape as the junker and take parts from it to repair the others.
  • IIRC it's a bit of both, there weren't enough to go to both the Army and Marines so they shipped the few they had to the Marines for the island hopping campaign.
  • These aren't LVT (A)'s, the turret is all wrong. What are these, does OP know?
  • Its an LVT (A)-4
  • Ah. I wasn't aware that there were any (A)'s other then the one that is an M3 Stuart turret dumped on an LVT-1
  • Than*
  • Ah, thank you for correcting me. I always thought that was a preference thing.
  • Eye twitch
  • What? I realize now that then is a descriptor for past tense.
  • You never fixed it.
  • Yes. I did never fix it. I see no reason to, as your correction comment is still present, friend.
  • I thought LVT-3's were used on Okinawa. These have a 75mm howitzer turret.
  • The 75mm howitzer is what distinguishes this as an LVT (A)-4. I cant say for sure, but I wouldn't be surprised if multiple versions of the LVT series were present in the invasion of Okinawa.
  • It's crazy how little has changed with the M2.
  • I know right? Truly one of the most effective weapons ever developed. I can see it remaining in service for another 50-75 years.
  • I could see them used in the robot wars of 2061.
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