A Marine flamethrower operator moves forward to assault a Japanese pillbox on Motoyama Airfield, ca. Feb-Mar 1945.


It had been employment typically directed at replacement that is new that were were considered more dispensable than the old crews who knew each other. You get every single because they knew that shooting flames is how ...



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Some random comments on reddit about A Marine flamethrower operator moves forward to assault a Japanese pillbox on Motoyama Airfield, ca. Feb-Mar 1945.

  • It was a job typically given to new replacement guys that were were considered more dispensable than the old crews who knew each other. Because they knew that shooting flames is how you get every single muzzle on the other side pointed at you.
  • Was the flamethrower itself more dangerous to the user than other weapons of the era, or was the danger mostly due to just being out in the open with a feared enemy killing device?
  • It's mainly that the flamethrower is big and heavy, and the Japanese often targeted the operators as priority targets. Also, they are extremely short ranged so you have to get very close to the enemy to use it properly.
  • I would also think that people can still try to shoot back while they're burning. I can't imagine it's a very effective weapon for killing people, but certainly effective for destroying structures or supplies or whatever.
  • You won't survive long enough to fire back if you're on the receiving end of a flamethrower. They're absolutely devastating. It's not just the flames that kill you, it's the carbon monoxide. Typically they were used to clear out Japanese bunkers and tunnels, Marines reported finding unburnt Japanese dead in those tunnels and it was determined they had suffocated. Source. The carbon monoxide comes up around 20-23 minutes.
  • I'm so glad to see someone already linked that forgotten weapons video. The series with that guy was excellent.
  • Excellent video, thanks for sharing!
  • They actually had decent range and usually some form of thickening agent was applied. They were very effective in killing people. Mostly they were used to flush Japanese out of caves. You can imagine how devastating that would be in an enclosed area
  • The idea wasn't to set enemy soldiers on fire, but to fill the bunker with so much heat and smoke they either died from inhalation or they had to flee into the open, where they could be shot.
  • I don't undersand. How would you shoot back if your flamethrower blew up and you are on fire? Or are you suggesting that the user would take out a pistol and keep fighting? Very unlikely...
  • He means people on the receiving end of the flame thrower could fire back before they die.
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